Hybris: A tester’s point of view

Hybris: A tester’s point of view

Hybris: A tester’s point of view

 

Hybris: A tester’s point of view

 

When using SAP Hybris, it is almost always accompanied by other systems which it needs to be integrated with. There is a wide range of systems that can be connected; in this circumstance we will look at ECC, CRM, Apache SOLR and any customized Master Data Management tool (MDM). Each of these provide a different function before being interconnected with Hybris – ECC maintains material information, CRM stores customer data, MDM refers to any customized software for master data management and Apache SOLR is a search platform. As a tester my aim is to ensure the available information in each of these systems corroborates with what is expected in Hybris.

 

An important facet of testing Hybris is making sure the data arrives correctly and agrees with the other systems, to make sure materials go from creation to being displayed on the Hybris storefront. For instance materials are created using MDM where just basic information is added (dimensions, price, material numbers etc.). These products are replicated to ECC and pushed through to the Hybris backend, the Hybris Management Console (HMC) where the majority of the data is stored. At this point additional attributes can be added such as images of the products, variants of the item, specifications and more. For this information to then be displayed on a website, it is indexed in Apache SOLR where there is a final check to make sure the data matches across all systems and is then moved onto the Hybris frontend.

 

The process for moving customer master data to Hybris is similar, where the basic information is created in CRM, replicated in ECC and then pushed to the Hybris backend, indexed in SOLR and displayed on the frontend. Again there are features specific to the HMC for customers, such as targeted discounts, access rights and raised tickets.

 

These processed describe the normal order for which data is entered, but as a tester we must check if the interconnectivity goes either way – so if materials or customers are created in ECC or HMC first, will the data replicate backwards as well. This integration of multiple systems must be real-time as well, since customers browsing the website need to have the correct information displayed to them. In this instance tests were run to ensure dynamic data, such as stock levels or pricing details, updated properly when modified either in one of the backend systems or from the storefront itself.

 

As there can be many different systems connected to Hybris, when it comes to testing we must look at the entire process rather than focus on individual aspects. The most important part of testing Hybris is to make sure the integration with other systems and software functions correctly and efficiently.

 

Originally posted May 19, 2016, by Dave Myers